Journey to…the Mysterious Island – BardHaven’s Story Part 3

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Finally they were under way to accost Phillip! The Aronnax slowly eased away from the dock in Caledon Cay covered in a waving, shouting crowd as the Baron of BardHaven paced along the rail, throwing beads and trinkets to the local ladies and applauding the results of said attentions. There is a good reason why they call Caledon Cay the “Small Easy”.

The other members of the expedition busied themselves with the various equipment as Dr. Sputnik made certain his blue hut was well secured with curious silver ropes and Mr. Abel was in hushed, soothing conversation with his penguins, one of whom kept staring at the Duchess of Loch Avie as if she were a particularly juicy sardine.

Once the gracious farewell of Caledon Cay was well at their stern, Baron BardHaven finally made his way to the ships wheel where the Captain stood, a darkly handsome man with very poor hygiene and heavy eye shadow. His hair hung in semi dreadlocks beneath any number of scarves, a wispy beard tied into three rat tails dangled from his chin. He steered a strong course towards the volcano, an apparently broken compass in his hand.
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Born to Die

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As a father, I am well aware that child rearing is as prone to styles and fads as any other human activity. That is why I am always fascinated by getting a glimpse at how previous generations raised their children.

The Victorian period was one in which most children were expected to think, act and feel as unusually short grownups from an early age. Therefore, they were also expected to deal with many topics that we tend to try and insulate our children from. First and foremost among those topics was death.

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