“Clock the World”

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As I have often stated, some times I come across treasures as I skate the aether, and today I found a whole sea chest full of them. However, pride of place this afternoon goes to a screenplay called Clockers, a Victorian rewrite of the cult film Hackers.

 

Here is the introduction on the website:

IN A WORLD not quite like our own, where the industrial revolution was triggered not by steam, but by springs…

Where the works of the world are hidden in tunnels and towers, from all but the most determined and reckless…

Where some of the birds have cogs for eyes…

Where clockwork construction is depicted just about as realistically as computers in Hollywood movies…

… young Daedelus Murphy and his ragtag band of friends and rivals are about to learn that that curiosity can be the most dangerous crime of all.

CLOCKERS
A parody of the United Artists film Hackers,
by Holly Gramazio and Brendan Adkins

A small sample of the dialog…

Shivery. So for what was the scheme hatched, you ask? World domination? Nay. Something far less tasteful, not nearly so in tune with our nation’s global interests. An automaton called Da Vinci, that when launched would cause the Ellingson Bigben to run rogue through our fair city, was to be blamed on innocent clockers. But this automaton was really the duck decoy, right. What could be so insurmountably important that someone would create such a nasty, boot-foxed, very warm automaton?

Could it be to cover the tracks for a little worm contraption? A worm that was to steal a million pounds? The cogs for this hungry little dishclout were custom-made for Eugenia Belford, Ellingson’s very own Clockwork Security Officer.

At the link below you can find the full script in both HTML and PDF formats, and a podcast of a reading of the script.

Read it. Love it.

Clock the World

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1 Comment

  1. *wonders if Desmond will cobble together a Victorian Clockwork sim in Caledon.* Odd, this is like the third or fourth clockwork post I have read in the Caledonian/Steelhead blogs the past two days, all about a different topic within the clockwork genre, yet all about clockworks.


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